Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is an ocular manifestation of diabetes, a systemic disease, which affects up to 80 percent of all patients who have had diabetes for 10 years or more. The longer a person has diabetes, the higher his or her chances are of developing diabetic retinopathy.

Despite these intimidating statistics, research indicates that at least 90 percent of new cases could be reduced. Education on diabetic eye disease and retinopathy is especially important because it is often preventable or treatable. Unfortunately, this means it can go unnoticed in the early stages. As the disease progresses, permanent vision loss is a real possibility if the patient does not receive treatment.

There are multiple forms of diabetic retinopathy, and only your doctor can determine your particular form. With one form, blood vessels may swell and leak fluid. In another, abnormal new blood vessels grow on the surface of the retina.

Stages of Diabetic Retinopathy

In the early stages of diabetic retinopathy, many do not notice a change to their vision because there are little to no symptoms. If an eye doctor does not catch diabetic retinopathy early, one could sustain mild blurriness at near or far distances, as well as floaters. In severe cases, a sudden loss of vision may occur.

Unfortunately, diabetic retinopathy can result in permanent damage that cannot be reversed.  However, if caught in time, prescribed treatments may slow development and prevent vision loss.

Concerned about the onset of diabetic retinopathy? Please call us at 810-658-2020 to schedule a preventative eye examination today with Dr. Lambaria.

Learn more about this type of diabetic eye disease by watching our video.

We are excited to announce that our office will be reopening on Monday, June 1st! To follow the current mandates, we do have some new procedures for the office.

We are taking every precaution to protect your health and safety. We are ensuring our practice is a safe environment, so you have a comfortable and excellent experience. Below are the steps we are taking for your safety:

  • Health screenings of employees and patients, including brief medical history and temperature before entering the office.
  • Practicing Social Distancing to reduce the risk of Coronavirus exposure
  • Wearing Personal Protection Equipment such as masks, face shields, and gloves, as necessary.
  • Sanitizing all equipment and frames for every patient.
  • Providing no-touch hand sanitizer stations in the office.
  • Reduced the number of patients seen per day.
  • We will continue to offer curbside pickups (if you prefer that method)

 

When you arrive at our office:

  • Call us at 810-658-2020.
  • We will ask the Coronavirus screening questions over the phone.
  • An employee will come out to your car and take your temperature with a no-touch thermometer.
  • When we have the availability, we will bring you inside the office.
    • All people entering the office are asked to wear a mask
    • Only the patient being seen for an exam or needing to pick up materials or have an adjustment will be permitted in the office. If it is a minor or an adult that needs a care provider, 1 adult is permitted to come in with them.

 

Your health and safety are our Number 1 priority. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any questions or concerns. We will do our best to address them.